Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (No Spoilers)

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This week’s book was Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling. It’s celebrating it’s twentieth anniversary so now is as good as a time as ever. It’s impossible to overstate the importance of this books and series in my life. This book sits alongside Fellowship of the Ring, as the novels that nurtured my love of reading. Like so many other people this book pulled me in and didn’t let me go for years.

I read and reread the books so many times when i was growing up. I wanted badly to go to Hogwarts, to live in J.K Rowling’s world. As such, it’s impossible for me to take off my nostalgia glasses and properly review this book.

I hadn’t read it in years and yet the magic inside was just as I remembered. The book is extremely charming and witty. It pulls you into the deep world, telling you just enough to give you little glimpses of it.

The characters feel real and you immediately root for them. Coming back and seeing how Harry, Ron, and Hermione all become friends was great. I always love the moments where great friendships are born and this is one of my favourites.

Pacing is a real strength of this novel, the plot speeds along at breakneck speed. At their core Harry Potter books are mysteries and this one is no different. Rowling leads the readers to ask certain questions and provides clues to keep them guessing.

I know people have issues with the series but I feel that they come along in later books when the plot becomes more complicated and the magic more involved.

Overall the Philosophers Stone is a great read, easy and addicting. If you haven’t read it yet I can’t recommend it enough. The magic that resides within it’s pages is too good to not be experienced.

You can follow my reading and writing adventures on Twitter at James Bee  

 

 

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The Warded Man Review (No Spoilers)

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The Warded Man by Peter V Brett is this week’s novel. Well, It finally happened, I ran into a book that I didn’t like enough to finish. I almost always finish every book I start. Even if I dislike it initially, the though that it might get good drives me on. I made it 250 pages into this novel before I gave up.

Honestly, I’m unsure exactly what i didn’t like about. The setting was interesting, demons rising each night, humanity struggling to survive their relentless attacks. The magic was cool enough.

Yet I couldn’t get into it. More than that, I found myself annoyed, struggling to turn each page. I feel like two things mainly contributed to this. One was the age of the protagonists. I find it’s hit or miss with children protagonists for me. If they’re too smart, too perfect i find it hard to believe. Something about these children did that for me, though I can’t exactly say what it was. I just found them off putting.

The writing style, mainly dialogue also put me off of this book. Like the characters this is a personal grievance, it wasn’t bad by any means.  It just didn’t jive with me. It felt very on the nose, leaving nothing up to the reader to figure out.

It should be said that this is a highly regarded series, many people like it. It has a 4.27 rating on GoodReads and has a multitude of gushing reviews behind it. It just wasn’t the book for me, though I could see why many people would like it.

This reminded me of the Wheel of Time books, which I also couldn’t get into. Though if i’d found them when I was younger i’m sure I would have. It’s very likely that the Warded Man is similar. The book may have just come to me at the wrong time. Still, if you like horror fantasy you should give it a look. My opinion certainly seems to be in the minority.

You can follow my writing adventures on twitter at James Bee

 

 

The Price of Valor Review (Spoiler Free)

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This week’s book is The Price of Valor by Django Wexler. It’s the third instalment of his Shadow Campaigns series. This novel picks up the story where the second left off. In fact, I found that this one is even stronger that the second novel. The few complaints I did have were largely fixed.

The conflict in this novel comes from both outside and within. Both in terms of the characters struggles and the overarching conflicts. Moreso in this novel than the others I felt the fingerprint of history. I would hazard that Wexler took lessons learned from revolutions and social uprisings and brought them to bear. Certainly this novel echoes the French Revolution’s bloodthirstyness.

Overall the stakes are raised nicely, forcing the characters to develop and grow. My one grip with this book is a certain love situation grows repetitive and frustrating, though that very well may have been the goal.

The star of this series for me has been the battle scenes and this novel is no exception. The action is fast and vivid, both large scale set pieces and more intimate personal conflicts. Though I’ve found that the characters started to feel invincible. With so much combat this kind of plot armour can be problematic.

Overall, I really enjoyed this novel. It carried and advanced the story ahead and made me really hungry for the next one. I would fully recommend this series to anyone who likes military fantasy, as this is one the greatest examples of it that I’ve read recently. 

Lords and Ladies Review (No Spoilers)

 

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This week’s book is Terry Pratchett’s Lords and Ladies. I was looking for a quicker more comfortable read then the past few novels. I’d heard a lot about Granny Weatherwax, having seen her top a number of lists about favourite fantasy characters.

This novel fully delivered on the praise heaped up it. Pratchett was in great form, filling the pages with jokes, interesting ideas and a variety of complex and interweaved plots and subplots. There was as much ridiculous shenanigans as I was hoping for, balanced against a number of serious critiques and criticisms.

However, my favourite part of the book was it’s interesting take of elves. In most of the fantasy that I’ve read, elves are clearly superior to humans. They live forever, often have powers, aren’t likely to have the same weaknesses as plain old humans. It was fascinating to see Pratchett take this notion and bring it to it’s conclusion. This mixed with a number of ideas about folklore and multiple dimensions kept me stimulated and interested throughout the whole novel.

Honestly, theres not much I can say about his novel that I haven’t already said about other Discworld books. It had a lot of heart, was well written and was just uniquely Pratchett. It hit all the beats that I wanted it to and I really enjoyed it. I would recommend it to anyone who has any sort of an interest in fantasy.

You can follow me on twitter at James Bee