James Reads Pawn of Prophecy By David Eddings (Spoiler Free)

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Pawn of Prophecy By David Eddings is this week’s book. This novel is the first one in the Belgariad. At the time of writing, this books is coming up on forty years old. And it shows. It’s hard to judge this book taken out of it’s time and thrust into modern times. It feels dated in some parts, especially in regards to it’s female characters, something that I’ve notice in other Eddings books.

However the novel is still enjoyable and entertaining. The characters are likeable enough and the plot is engaging if super predictable. The real strength is the world building with is robust and very deep. Gods and magic and prophecy, are all woven pretty deftly.

Honestly there just isn’t much I can say about the novel. If i’d read it as a younger man I would have liked it a lot better. I don’t want to write a criticism because it wouldn’t be fair to compare it against modern works. Books that built upon the legacy that Eddings created. Things fine are tropes now probably weren’t back then.

To sum up, this book just felt kind of left me feeling empty. It almost felt like a two hundred page prologue. It sets the stage for the next book but didn’t really leave me with a burning desire to pick them up.

But that’s okay, not all art ages well. Clearly this novel was very popular when it came out and people loved it. I just wasn’t around then and I probably lost out on the magic. Due to this I can’t really recommend this book like I can others of his. (The Elenium for instance I love.)

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James Reads Jingo By Terry Pratchett (No Spoilers)

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The Pratchett’ing continues this week with Jingo. Jingo is the 21st Discworld novel and the 4th in the City Watch series. Personally, I love the City Watch books. The characters feel like old friends, and the City of Ankh-Morpork is one of my favourite locations in all of fiction, right up there with Hogwarts and the Shire.

This novel really gives the characters of the City Watch room to do their thing.The plot focuses on the reemergence of an atlantean type continent which promptly begins to be fought over by Ankh-Morpork and a rival nation, despite it being a desolate, blasted rock.

This book is surprisingly relevant to current day politics on the global stage. The books title Jingo is a direct reference to Jingoism. Jingoism is defined as “extreme patriotism, especially in the form of aggressive or warlike foreign policy.” This is clearly something that is growing even more present in our current society.

In this book Pratchett dissects and makes fun of aggressive patriotism, racism and xenophobia. The rival faction Klatch is an obvious analog for the middle east and by facing them against Ankh-Morpork, you get a pretty robust comparison. Thought the novel Pratchett shows the dangers and folly of extreme aggressive patriotism, mainly by highlight the character ignorance and also showing how a like people can be, despite living in wildly different places.

Honestly, it’s a bit eerie and more than a little depressing how spot on this novel is, being that it was written in 1997.

The story itself is classic Discworld fun. Vimes is on a case, hunting for criminal, accompanied by the Night’s Watch. What’s more, they get to go traveling to a distant land, creating some ridiculous and hilarious situations. The plot is engaging and has enough twists and turns to keep you more than engaged. The characters live and grow throughout, learning lessons and passing trials.

Overall, this is a very good book, even by Discworld standards. The combination of delightful, entertaining plot combined with the biting satire create a novel that is as relevant today as when it was published. I would recommend this book to anyone, be they a fantasy fan or not. It contains an important lesson, one that many people need to hear in the times we live in today.

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James Reads: Maskarade by Terry Pratchett (No Spoilers)

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This weeks book is Maskarade By Terry Pratchett. It is the 18th disc world book and the 5th in the Witches series.  In this novel Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg hit the road and travel to the wacky metropolis of Ankh-Morpork!

The easiest way to sum up this book is that it is a buddy travel movie mixed with a parody of phantom of the opera. Theres lots of opera shenanigans and tropes, many of which probably went over my head. The heart of the story is a murder mystery which is fun. In fact many of my favourite Pratchett books are when he does mysteries.

In any mystery the most important aspect if it can keep you guessing until the end. Personally I’m a terrible detective so I never see twists and turns coming.This was no different, I had a dozen different theories until the big reveal happened. Overall it was a very competent murder mystery, lots of good twists and turns.

As far as how it stacks up against the other books in the Witches Series and the Discworld at large, I would say it was one my favourites. I’m a sucker for a tight plot that forces you to pay attention and plays off of your expectations. This novel delivered on all of that. However I would say that to fully enjoy this novel it would be good to read the other Witches books first. I usually don’t say this with Discworld books but in this case I think it would be helpful! Other than that, Maskarade was a delightful read, one that I would recommend to any fan of the Discworld or Terry Pratchett at large!

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